Question Tips on how to (re)house train an adult dog?

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Jaye
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Tips on how to (re)house train an adult dog?

Post by Jaye » Wed Feb 22, 2017 8:33 am

So, we are thinking about taking on a 5 1/2 yr old standard poodle whose owner can no longer care for him due to health issues, among other things.
Apparently it takes his owner about 10-15 minutes to get out of bed and downstairs to let him out in the morning, so he's been having accidents because he just can't hold it in any longer. Can anyone weigh in on how difficult it would be to retrain an adult dog?

This dog has a number of other issues, such as he's skittish and fearful, barks like crazy at people he doesn't know, and runs away cowering from men in particular. We think we can work with him on most of them, though, since our :heart: dog, Scooby, had a similar temperament, and he got a lot better after he had been with us for little while.

I am also looking for some advice on where to go to learn how to groom a poodle. Because he's so fearful (and hates having his paws touched), grooming has been an issue: the hair on his ears is quite matted and his feet are - well - a mess. If we do decide to take this boy on, we would like to find a good groomer who can do a proper fix-up and then I would hopefully be able to take on maintenance grooming. Any suggestions for a good groomer in the Ottawa area?
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RIP Scooby, AKA Awesome Dog. Too well loved to ever be forgotten. "Sometime in June", 2005 - January 24, 2017. :feed ducks:

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Tips on how to (re)house train an adult dog?

Post by XBRIT » Wed Feb 22, 2017 9:09 am

Patience and trust will work wonders plus treats/rewards always work for me. Once he gets into a routine he will be waiting at the door. If you have another dog to let out, he will follow. As for grooming, contact your local humane society or rescue organization and find out who is experienced with a rescue dog. I have lost over 30 little guys over the past 12 years, mostly older and abused etc. Have a number still with me, each with their own story to tell. Love and kindness goes a long way and of course treats. Good luck.
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Jaye
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Tips on how to (re)house train an adult dog?

Post by Jaye » Wed Feb 22, 2017 12:02 pm

Many thanks, XBRIT - great tips and info!
I will get in touch with one of the rescue organizations in our area today to find out who they use.
So glad to hear from another rescue animal supporter and expert.
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RIP Scooby, AKA Awesome Dog. Too well loved to ever be forgotten. "Sometime in June", 2005 - January 24, 2017. :feed ducks:

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Tips on how to (re)house train an adult dog?

Post by XBRIT » Wed Feb 22, 2017 12:40 pm

So sorry Jaye, I didn't realize you had just lost Scooby. You couldn't change what he went through in his past but let him know what it was like to be loved and do all the things to make him happy. Thank you for that.
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Shnookie
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Tips on how to (re)house train an adult dog?

Post by Shnookie » Wed Feb 22, 2017 12:45 pm

Poodles are usually really smart and learn quickly. Rewards help - food or praise. My first dog was a Cocker Spaniel that had never learned to have his nails cut or his hair groomed. The groomer I took him to had a lot of patience. His first haircut and bath took three and a half hours. He had a lot of mats. Each time I took him for grooming I got tips about grooming and ways to work on it at home. After a while I learned to do it myself. I think you could help this dog work out its issues. Good Luck.
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Jaye
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Tips on how to (re)house train an adult dog?

Post by Jaye » Wed Feb 22, 2017 1:03 pm

Thank you for your caring words, XBRIT. We will always be so grateful for the time we had with Scooby, but we still miss him very much.
The ad for this rescue dog just sort of jumped out at me while I was looking for something else on Kijiji. I talked to hubby about it and he agreed that he would be a difficult dog to place, and maybe we should consider him. So the process is underway. Vet check is scheduled for later this aft. Wish us luck ... it may be a bit of an challenge getting him into the car wit us so that we can drive him to the vet's office. Thankfully our vet is a woman, and is great with dogs.

Thanks, Shnookie - I am hoping that with patience and persistence, he will learn to trust us, be less afraid of men and let me touch his feet so that I can get them cleaned up. ;-)
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RIP Scooby, AKA Awesome Dog. Too well loved to ever be forgotten. "Sometime in June", 2005 - January 24, 2017. :feed ducks:

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Tips on how to (re)house train an adult dog?

Post by XBRIT » Wed Feb 22, 2017 2:26 pm

Try to spend a little time with him and of course give him treats but hold it out and let him move at his own pace, then hold your hand out and let him sniff it, if you can touch him even better. Paws for life on UTube have many rescues so watch how he approaches dogs that he has never met. Please keep me updated as things progress.
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kenya
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Tips on how to (re)house train an adult dog?

Post by kenya » Wed Feb 22, 2017 5:14 pm

Poodles are eady to train, housebreaking should take no time at all. Getting the dog over its fear just means you have to socialize this dog, obviously it was not done. If its really fearful take it out for walks, have it walk by people but don't force the dog to say hello until the dog feels more secure, once it starts feeling more secure, ask it "do you want to say hello "and let the dog go up to the people to do so. At first do not force the dog to be touched but do reward the dog with a treat, make it a pleasant experience. Important to let the dog go up to the people, if you see the dog starting to act uncomfortable praise her. for going up to the people but stop the interaction before it becomes uncomfortable. Its time comsuming but a walk a day with at least one hello and you can change it right around.
Look at clicker training to get over the fear of grooming and nail trimming.
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Farrier1987
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Tips on how to (re)house train an adult dog?

Post by Farrier1987 » Wed Feb 22, 2017 6:14 pm

I have found with almost all animals that they need an alpha around, and take most of their cues from the alpha. When that alpha is a human (you), their confidence depends a lot on you. Be firm and in charge, without being a drill sergeant demanding instant obedience. It can be a fine line, but too much one way or the other, things don't often work out well. A lot more than most people realize is communicated by the tone of voice used in particular situations. imes try to be consistent. It needs to be the same every time or the trust does not develop.

I find this to be true with most animals, horses, dogs for sure. Less so for cats, and then there are my bad goats. I won't go into that.

Firmness, kindness and consistency will gain trust and that is what the whole thing is built on. Good luck with it.
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Tips on how to (re)house train an adult dog?

Post by XBRIT » Thu Feb 23, 2017 9:31 am

Hello Jaye,Re my last post "spend a little time with him" I was referring to your concerns getting him into the car . Spend time with him prior to taking him to the vet. I would suggest if he is afraid of men, let hubby drive and you sit in the back with the dog. I have a feeling that he will take to you and you will take him on the leash (let him do his business first) then climb into the back seat with a slight tug on the leash. Of course treats in your hand.
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