First Aid Kit

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SandyM
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First Aid Kit

Post by SandyM » Sun Apr 10, 2016 9:18 pm

I like to have a first aid kit so to speak for any 'species' that I am housing.

With chickens I quickly learned what to have on hand because not everything is open 24/7. Corid. Stop Pick. Vitamin powder. antibiotics water additive and a few other items.

I'm wanting to put a first aid kit together for my bees arriving in June. I'll have an epi pen, spare honey (for stings), formic acid and I'm trying to figure out which mite treatment etc to add.

Any other suggestions would be greatly appreciated
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Bakers Backyard
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First Aid Kit

Post by Bakers Backyard » Mon Apr 11, 2016 12:04 pm

Just a word of caution first... please don't just prophylactically throw treatments at the bees in panics without first fully analyzing the situation and then using the correct dosage of the right thing at the right time.
Bee's aren't chickens. They are, or were and still could be, wild insects that are very able to look after themselves if we let them. Varroa mites are one area where they can use our help, and you will want to take mite counts to determine the level of infestation so when they need it you can make the right call to treat them (if that's what you want to do). Certain treatments cannot be used while there are honey supers on, some are not effective when the queen is making brood (because varroa breed inside the capped brood cells).
Here is one thing I find handy to keep with me in the bee yard.
- powdered cinnamon. If you have ant problems in your hives, usually chewing up your inner cover above the bees, they hate cinnamon. Dust the top of your inner cover and that will help a lot.

As for treatments, you'll have to do some research or get help from an experienced beekeeper, but I have never treated my bees. Though this year I will be treating one of my yards for varroa in the fall with oxalic acid sublimation, which is vaporizing the oxalic acid in the hive which is very effective at killing varroa, considered to be an "organic" treatment, as it wont build up in the wax, and it is found naturally in the environment. But like I said, certain times of year.
I will not use antibiotics on my bees.

Anyways, lots of stuff here. I'm sure Brian will have some other opinions as well, as 10 beekeepers, get 100 answers ;)
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Bakers Backyard
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First Aid Kit

Post by Bakers Backyard » Mon Apr 11, 2016 12:21 pm

Sandy, if you have nobody to learn hands on with, I highly recommend you consider this course on introductory beekeeping with the Ontario beekeepers association tech transfer team. What you see and learn will really be a benefit to you because trust me, you're going to run into things and there are a lot of questions that come up when you see things in the hives for the first time.
http://www.ontariobee.com/outreach/workshops

“INTRODUCTORY BEEKEEPING”

This beekeeping workshop consists of classroom sessions and hands-on lessons in the bee yard. Participants of all experience levels are welcome. Topics include basic honey bee biology, beekeeping equipment, working in the bee colony, seasonal beekeeper responsibilities, harvesting and extracting honey and preparing bee colonies for winter. Each participant will receive a copy of the Ontario Beekeeping Manual.

Locations: May 1st - Woodbridge (Full) / May 14th - Milton (Full) / May 28th - Port Hope (Full) / June 4th - Simcoe (Full) / June 11th - Metcalfe (Ottawa area) / June 18th - Ancaster / June 25 - Niagara
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windwalkingwolf
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First Aid Kit

Post by windwalkingwolf » Mon Apr 11, 2016 8:41 pm

Out of curiosity, what's the formic acid used for Sandy?
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SandyM
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First Aid Kit

Post by SandyM » Tue Apr 12, 2016 7:56 am

It's for the Varroa mites in brood cells.
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SandyM
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First Aid Kit

Post by SandyM » Tue Apr 12, 2016 7:59 am

Some beekeepers suggest treatments in the spring and I think the fall too. I'd have to double check that. I have a seasoned beekeeper that will be helping me along and I can ask etc. So far he's been amazingly supportive. I don't imagine treating unless there is a problem. Still learning and reading so that could all change.

Brian has some great products and information on his site. It's been very helpful!
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Bakers Backyard
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First Aid Kit

Post by Bakers Backyard » Tue Apr 12, 2016 12:06 pm

Yes, formic is also considered to be an "organic" varroa mite treatment, but has been known to kill brood and cause queen issues as well. A fall treatment is your best chance of having healthy winter bees (bees that have to live in the hive all winter long). Spring treatment should not be required so much if you do a good oxalic treatment in fall when there is little to no brood as mite levels will be almost down to nothing. Glad to hear you have a mentor, that is what you need in your toolbox ;) lol I'm always happy to give advice as well.
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SandyM
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First Aid Kit

Post by SandyM » Tue Apr 12, 2016 12:13 pm

Thanks BB! You're obviously knowledgable and passionate about keeping bees. such a great community these beekeepers are!! Bounds of offers to help and mountains of advice :)
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Bakers Backyard
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First Aid Kit

Post by Bakers Backyard » Tue Apr 12, 2016 12:33 pm

bees on the brain 24/7 lol :D watch out, it'll happen to you!
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